Chipewyan and Métis People of La Loche

Fonds name: 
Chipewyan and Métis People of La Loche
Accession number: 
R-5940 to R-5955
Lang. of recordings: 
English
IR: 
Summaries of some interviews
Description: 
Interviews conducted in 1980 under a contract of the Saskatchewan Archives Board. Interviewees are five Chipewyan and six Métis people who have lived in the north of Saskatchewan, near and in La Loche. Their experiences and stories reveal much about their native backgrounds as they speak of their personal histories and those of their families, comparing life as it used to be with what it has become for them today. Also, an awareness of La Loche as a community is gained from their reminiscences. For the most part, the interviews were conducted in English and Chipewyan with the assistance of an interpreter. Though this is not the most ideal way for interviews to be undertaken, it has advantages in that the informants were made more comfortable with the use of their native language and, also, an older style of Chipewyan speaking has been documented which might otherwise have been lost. Most informants speak of their livelihoods and for both men and women this includes such things as trapping, hunting, fishing, and working for the Hudson's Bay Company. Necessarily a considerable amount of information related is about life in the bush; i.e. shelter, food, cooking, supplies, travelling and making birch bark canoes. The importance of certain elements in La Loche such as the R.C.M.P., the Hudson's Bay Company and the church are revealed as well, showing the relationships these have with the community. Their role in the North today is compared to what it used to be before white culture became so prominent. Unlike other native oral history projects in the Archives collection, these tapes deal very little with the folklore, legends, songs, beliefs and traditions of native people but more with their daily lives and how they are adapting to white culture.
Place name: 
Language of Record: 
First Nations / Indigenous Group: 
Name interviewer: 
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